Divine impassibility an essay in philosophical theology

But Buddhists do accept the existence of beings in higher realms (see Buddhist cosmology ), known as devas , but they, like humans, are said to be suffering in samsara , [13] and are not necessarily wiser than us. The Buddha is often portrayed as a teacher of the gods, [14] and superior to them. [15] Despite this, there are believed to be enlightened devas. [16] But since there may also be unenlightened devas, there also may be godlike beings who engage in retributive acts, but if they do so, then they do so out of their own ignorance of a greater truth.

Many polytheistic traditions portray their gods as feeling a wide range of emotions. For example, Zeus is famous for his lustfulness , Susano-o for his intemperance, and Balder for his joyousness and calm. Impassibility in the Western tradition traces back to ancient Greek philosophers like Aristotle and Plato , who first proposed the idea of God as a perfect, omniscient , timeless, and unchanging being not subject to human emotion (which represents change and imperfection). The concept of impassibility was developed by medieval theologians like Anselm and continues to be in tension with more emotional concepts of God.

Divine impassibility an essay in philosophical theology

divine impassibility an essay in philosophical theology

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