Anti death penalty argument essay

Bishop Blaire Welcomes Repeal Of Death Penalty In Maryland
May 2, 2013

Bishops Welcome Connecticut Death Penalty Repeal
April 26, 2012

USCCB, Illinois Bishops Laud State's Death Penalty Repeal
March 10, 2011

Bishops Urge Illinois Governor to Sign Bill Ending Death Penalty
March 3, 2011

Bishops Congratulate New Mexico on Death Penalty's Repeal
March 19, 2009

Bishops Urge NM Governor to Sign Death Penalty Repeal
Bishop William F. Murphy, March 16, 2009

Bishops Launch Major Campaign to End the Use of the Death Penalty | En Español
March 21, 2005

Bishops Commend Governor's Clemency to Death Row Inmates
January 16, 2003

Who is homosexual? My answer is that a homosexual is somebody who is abnormal because the normal person was created to be attracted to the opposite sex ... to procreate and perpetuate the human race... [M]y bishop of North Ankole, Rt. Rev. Muhanguzi ... asked the following question: ... How can God contradict himself by saying in the Book of Genesis that Adam should be given a wife, Eve, and then also create homosexuals? ... However, now that I have been forced to concentrate my mind on this issue by the actions of a small group of our MPs led by the Rt. Hon. Kadaga, I can see the fallacy of Bishop Muhanguzi's position... Do Albinos create themselves? No. Simply, nature goes wrong in a minority of cases... The question at the core of the debate of the homosexuals is: "What do we do with an abnormal person? Do we kill him/her? Do we imprison him/her? Or do we contain him/her?" ... Apart from the people who are born abnormal, it seems there is a larger group of those that become homosexual for mercenary reasons - they get recruited on account of financial inducements... How about the women lesbians? Apart from the ones who are born abnormal and the ones that may become lesbian for mercenary reasons, there may be those that go into that practice because of sexual starvation when they fail to get married. Women are normally more [numerous] than men.... In the past, this imbalance could have been addressed by polygamy... The groups that can be rescued ... are those who are homosexual or lesbian for mercenary reasons or on account of ... failure to get legal partners. The rescue for these mercenary deviants is, first and foremost, economic - rapidly industrialize Uganda, modernize agriculture, etc... In addition ... we should legislate harshly against those people with money, from within and without, who take advantange of the desperation of our youth to lure them into these abnormal and deviant behaviors. I would support a life sentence.... On this one I would agree with the Bill passed by Parliament. The unanswered question, however, is: What do you do with the really abnormal people? ... Only the other day, I saw on television that Dr. Allan Turing, the genius mathematician that cracked the German Enigma code for the anti-Hitler alliance ... was a homosexual. This man ... enabled them to win the war. Yet, the British chemically castrated him in 1952, where-upon he committed suicide, apparently. Were the British correct in handling that issue like that? The British no longer think so. Only the other day, the Queen had to apologize to this ... person ... [who was] much more useful to society than the millions of sexually normal people... [T]he challenge is how to correctly handle the sexually abnormal on the one hand and those who use money or any other influence to recruit sexually normal people into this abnormal and disgusting behaviour. When we meet in the NRM caucus, we shall, I am sure, find a scientifically correct position.

"An execution is not simply death. It is just as different from the privation of life as a concentration camp is from prison. It adds to death a rule, a public premeditation known to the future victim, an organization which is itself a source of moral sufferings more terrible than death. Capital punishment is the most premeditated of murders, to which no criminal's deed, however calculated can be compared. For there to be an equivalency, the death penalty would have to punish a criminal who had warned his victim of the date at which he would inflict a horrible death on him and who, from that moment onward, had confined him at his mercy for months. Such a monster is not encountered in private life." Albert Camus---"Reflections on the Guillotine, Resistance, Rebellion & Death" (1956). also, see: http:///en/news/68097 **************************** Plea Against the Death Penalty Look, examine, reflect. You hold capital punishment up as an example. Why? Because of what it teaches. And just what is it that you wish to teach by means of this example? That thou shalt not kill. And how do you teach that "thou shalt not kill"? By killing. I have examined the death penalty under each of its 2 aspects: as a direct action, and as an indirect one. What does it come down to? Nothing but something horrible and useless, nothing but a way of shedding blood that is called a crime when an individual commits it, but is (sadly) called "justice" when society brings it about. Make no mistake, you lawmakers and judges, in the eyes of God as in those of conscience, what is a crime when individuals do it is no less an offense when society commits the deed. Victor Hugo, Speech at the Constituent Assembly, September 15, 1848 This webpage was last updated on October 6, 2017

A study released by the Urban Institute on March 6, 2008 forecast that the lifetime cost to taxpayers for the capitally-prosecuted cases in Maryland since 1978 will be $186 million.  That translates to $ million for each of the state’s five executions since the state reenacted the death penalty. The study estimates that the average cost to Maryland taxpayers for reaching a single death sentence is $3 million - $ million more than the cost of a non-death penalty case. (This includes investigation, trial, appeals, and incarceration costs.) The study examined 162 capital cases that were prosecuted between 1978 and 1999 and found that those cases will cost $186 million more than what those cases would have cost had the death penalty not existed as a punishment. At every phase of a case, according to the study, capital murder cases cost more than non-capital murder cases.

Of the 162 capital cases, there were 106 cases in which a death sentence was sought but not handed down in Maryland. Those cases cost the state an additional $71 million compared to the cost non-death penalty cases.  Those costs were incurred simply to seek the death penalty where the ultimate outcome was a life or long-term prison sentence.

(J. McMenamin, “Death penalty costs Md. more than life term,” Baltimore Sun, March 6, 2008). Read the entire study here .

Anti death penalty argument essay

anti death penalty argument essay

A study released by the Urban Institute on March 6, 2008 forecast that the lifetime cost to taxpayers for the capitally-prosecuted cases in Maryland since 1978 will be $186 million.  That translates to $ million for each of the state’s five executions since the state reenacted the death penalty. The study estimates that the average cost to Maryland taxpayers for reaching a single death sentence is $3 million - $ million more than the cost of a non-death penalty case. (This includes investigation, trial, appeals, and incarceration costs.) The study examined 162 capital cases that were prosecuted between 1978 and 1999 and found that those cases will cost $186 million more than what those cases would have cost had the death penalty not existed as a punishment. At every phase of a case, according to the study, capital murder cases cost more than non-capital murder cases.

Of the 162 capital cases, there were 106 cases in which a death sentence was sought but not handed down in Maryland. Those cases cost the state an additional $71 million compared to the cost non-death penalty cases.  Those costs were incurred simply to seek the death penalty where the ultimate outcome was a life or long-term prison sentence.

(J. McMenamin, “Death penalty costs Md. more than life term,” Baltimore Sun, March 6, 2008). Read the entire study here .

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